Residents Highlight risk to local economy, lack of jobs, and toxic spills as Kinder Morgan makes official application to build new pipeline

logo-green-guy-100.pngLower Mainland, BC - The other shoe has dropped. Now there are two active applications to build tar sands pipelines across BC. Kinder Morgan’s proposal to add a new 540,000 barrel-per-day pipeline was submitted to the National Energy Board on December 16. PIPE UP, a network of residents of Southwestern BC, finds the application consistent with what BC residents have heard from the company in the past year-and-a-half and thinks British Columbians will want to be heard about how these projects could change their way of life. 

“They want to turn BC into a carbon corridor,” said Chilliwack resident Michael Hale. “This tar sands project exposes BC residents to all the risks of bitumen transport with few benefits. The question is: ‘Should we put communities, ecosystems, and coastal industries at risk so that Kinder Morgan can make huge profits at our expense?’”

Abbotsford resident Lynn Perrin stated: “I’ve been reading through the company’s enormous submission and don’t find their claims credible. There are pages and pages on the alleged economic benefits of the pipeline. I had to look hard to find it, but there are less than 100 permanent jobs in BC after construction is completed. The small number of permanent jobs is not worth the risks to school children, aquifers, rivers and wetlands.

“The company’s claims sound very similar to the ones made by Enbridge in their submission for the Northern Gateway project. That submission has been analyzed by economists such as Mark Lee of Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and Robyn Allan, former head of ICBC. Both conclude that there are ‘no net benefits for BC’. We need to take these warnings seriously,” said Perrin. 

“What community in BC wants to contend with the horror of a bitumen spill?” said Aldergrove resident Susan Davidson. “I think that a criterion for a world class spill response would be no spills at all. By that I mean not only no pipeline spill, but also no tanker truck spill and no rail spill. Of course the companies cannot meet that standard. We have seen the horrors of the tar sands spills in Burnaby in 2007, Kalamazoo Michigan in 2010 and Mayflower Arkansas earlier this year. The Trans Mountain Pipeline has had 80 spills over its lifetime. That is more than one per year (there were two spills this year). 

Davidson offered the following advice to the BC Government: “Listen to the people. Don’t allow shipment of this dangerous stuff through BC. We need an energy plan for BC that meets our energy needs sustainably, ensures prosperity for all and preserves our magnificent environment.” 

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Members of the PIPE UP Network have spent the past year-and-a-half educating themselves and their neighbours on the pros and cons of the transport of oil sands diluted bitumen. PIPE UP will be filing for intervenor status in the National Energy Board hearings to raise concerns that relate to transporting the toxic heavy oil product through places within their communities.

For more information or for interviews, please contact: 

Susan Davidson,     Aldergrove        (604) 857-1400
Michael Hale,          Chilliwack          (604) 799-3391
Lynn Perrin,             Abbotsford        (604) 309-9369
 


PIPE UP Network
Website: http://pipe-up.net/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PipeUpNetwork

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Kinder Morgan digging into the Fraser Valley? We need you!

Dear friends and neighbours,

As you may have heard, Kinder Morgan has just filed the necessary paperwork to start the process of attempting to run an additional tar sands pipeline from Alberta to BC, despite a clear lack of First Nations and public support and despite it being impossible to meet Christy Clark's five conditions for new pipelines to be built in British Columbia.

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Kinder Morgan files formal application for Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

BY GORDON HOEKSTRA, VANCOUVER SUN DECEMBER 16, 2013 12:06 PM

 
Kinder Morgan files formal application for Trans Mountain pipeline expansion
 

Kinder Morgan oil pipeline pumping station at Sumas. Kinder Morgan today filed its formal application for its proposed $5.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which will triple oil capacity and bring more tankers to Burrard Inlet.

 

Kinder Morgan today filed its formal application for its proposed $5.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which will triple oil capacity and bring more tankers to Burrard Inlet.

The submission of the project application to the National Energy Board (NEB) is a key step in the start of the high-level federal review, which has seen pushback from First Nations, environmentalists and community groups concerned about the potential for spills on the pipeline and from tankers.

The application submitted to the NEB is more than 15,000 pages and stands about two metres high, contained in 37 binders.


Read more:http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Kinder+Morgan+files+formal+application+Trans+Mountain+pipeline+expansion/9292403/story.html#ixzz2nfp7MrUv

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Tar Sands Reporting Project

 

Tired of mainstream reporting that seems more focused on spectacle and fluff than on critical issues of our times?

Then you might like the Vancouver Observer's idea of crowdfunding the in-depth work needed to really cover the Tar Sands issues.  Vancouver Observer reporters hope to go to the Tar Sands and along the pipeline routes to get the stories of the people involved. The Tar Sands workers, the First Nations, the people who live along the pipeline routes, industry, academics, activists...

Check it out!
Tar Sands Reporting Project
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First Nations Gain Powerful New Allies in Fight Against Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline and Tankers

 

We were honoured to be a part of this historic document with our member Susan Davidson signing on behalf of The PIPE UP Network!

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VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA/COAST SALISH TERRITORY--(Marketwired - Dec. 5, 2013) - 

The Yinka Dene Alliance (YDA) has welcomed a new signatory to the Save the Fraser Declaration and has also launched a new Solidarity Accord, backed by some of Canada and BC's most powerful unions, as well as a host of local leaders from tourism businesses, municipal government, health and conservation organizations.

The Save the Fraser Declaration is an indigenous law banning tar sands pipelines and tankers from crossing BC, signed by representatives of over 130 First Nations.

Chief Archie Patrick of the Stellat'en First Nation signed the declaration, just moments before the launch of the new Solidarity Accord by Unifor, the BC Teachers' Federation, the BC Wilderness Tourism Association, the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment and the David Suzuki Foundation among others.

The Stellat'en First Nation is one of many First Nations along the proposed pipeline route that Enbridge has been trying to woo for years.

"First Nations opposition to Enbridge's project just keeps growing," said Chief Martin Louie of the Nadleh Whut'en First Nation. "Never before have we been joined by such a vast range of supporters from across Canadian society. This gives the alliance greater strength for the fight ahead and shows the magnitude and power of public opposition to this pipeline that is proposed to cross over our territories."

Through the Solidarity Accord, non-First Nations organizations and individuals pledge to stand with First Nations in upholding the Save the Fraser Declaration and stopping the Enbridge project, with a new website launching at www.holdthewall.ca.

"The Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project is simply too risky a proposal for our industry to support," said Jim DeHart, President of the BC Wilderness Tourism Association. "An oil spill would affect the major rivers or coastline of BC and threaten the entire provincial tourism industry. That's why we're signing this accord today."

"Unifor is proud to stand in solidarity with First Nations as they resist the Enbridge Northern Gateway project," said Gavin McGarrigle, Unifor Area Director for BC. "It's time for a new vision for Canada's energy industry - one that addresses the reality of aboriginal title and rights, respects our social and environmental commitments, and generates lasting wealth for all who live here."

The Save the Fraser Solidarity Accord may be found online at: http://savethefraser.ca/SolidarityAccord-nov2013.pdf.

CONTACT INFORMATION 

Nadleh Whut'en First Nation
Chief Martin Louie
250-570-7759

Yinka Dene Alliance
Geraldine Thomas Flurer
Coordinator
250-570-1482

 

 

 

 

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