Pages tagged "enbridge"


First Nations Gain Powerful New Allies in Fight Against Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline and Tankers

 

We were honoured to be a part of this historic document with our member Susan Davidson signing on behalf of The PIPE UP Network!

 save_the_fraser.jpg

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA/COAST SALISH TERRITORY--(Marketwired - Dec. 5, 2013) - 

The Yinka Dene Alliance (YDA) has welcomed a new signatory to the Save the Fraser Declaration and has also launched a new Solidarity Accord, backed by some of Canada and BC's most powerful unions, as well as a host of local leaders from tourism businesses, municipal government, health and conservation organizations.

The Save the Fraser Declaration is an indigenous law banning tar sands pipelines and tankers from crossing BC, signed by representatives of over 130 First Nations.

Chief Archie Patrick of the Stellat'en First Nation signed the declaration, just moments before the launch of the new Solidarity Accord by Unifor, the BC Teachers' Federation, the BC Wilderness Tourism Association, the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment and the David Suzuki Foundation among others.

The Stellat'en First Nation is one of many First Nations along the proposed pipeline route that Enbridge has been trying to woo for years.

"First Nations opposition to Enbridge's project just keeps growing," said Chief Martin Louie of the Nadleh Whut'en First Nation. "Never before have we been joined by such a vast range of supporters from across Canadian society. This gives the alliance greater strength for the fight ahead and shows the magnitude and power of public opposition to this pipeline that is proposed to cross over our territories."

Through the Solidarity Accord, non-First Nations organizations and individuals pledge to stand with First Nations in upholding the Save the Fraser Declaration and stopping the Enbridge project, with a new website launching at www.holdthewall.ca.

"The Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project is simply too risky a proposal for our industry to support," said Jim DeHart, President of the BC Wilderness Tourism Association. "An oil spill would affect the major rivers or coastline of BC and threaten the entire provincial tourism industry. That's why we're signing this accord today."

"Unifor is proud to stand in solidarity with First Nations as they resist the Enbridge Northern Gateway project," said Gavin McGarrigle, Unifor Area Director for BC. "It's time for a new vision for Canada's energy industry - one that addresses the reality of aboriginal title and rights, respects our social and environmental commitments, and generates lasting wealth for all who live here."

The Save the Fraser Solidarity Accord may be found online at: http://savethefraser.ca/SolidarityAccord-nov2013.pdf.

CONTACT INFORMATION 

Nadleh Whut'en First Nation
Chief Martin Louie
250-570-7759

Yinka Dene Alliance
Geraldine Thomas Flurer
Coordinator
250-570-1482

 

 

 

 


Alarm bells ring with new report of B.C.'s oil-spill system

Michael Smyth: Alarm bells ring with new report of B.C.'s oil-spill system
 

Premier Christy Clark is concerned that B.C. is not prepared for a large coastal oil spill.

Photograph by: Jason Payne , PNG

British Columbia is not prepared for a large coastal oil spill and the spill-prevention-and response system needs a major upgrade, especially before any new oil pipelines are approved.

That will be the bottom line in a new report on the province's oil-spill system to be released this week by the Christy Clark government.

As B.C. debates two major oil-pipeline projects — Enbridge's Northern Gateway pipeline and Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline — the government hired Alaska-based Nuka Research to investigate our coastal-spill system.

The company's report has been received by the government, I'm told, and Clark hinted at its contents in comments last week.

"We are woefully under resourced," Clark said, adding the spill-response system must be improved, especially "before any more heavy oil comes off the coast."

British Columbia already has hundreds of oil tankers passing through coastal waters and this week's report will question whether the spill-response system is adequate even for existing tanker traffic, I'm told.

The report will echo earlier concerns raised about B.C.'s inadequate preparation for a major coastal oil spill.

"Even a moderately sized spill would overwhelm the province's ability to respond and could result in a significant liability for government," said briefing notes prepared in June for B.C. Environment Minister Mary Polak and obtained by The Canadian Press.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/news/woefully+under+resourced+says+Clark/9003288/story.html


U.S. oil opponents turn attention to B.C. pipelines

Oil-sands opponents who have used their public-relations muscle into fighting the Keystone XL pipeline that would flow from Canada into the United States are turning their sights on two pipeline proposals in British Columbia.

Although neither the Trans Mountain nor the Northern Gateway projects cross the border in land, the American arm of the conservation group Forest Ethics said the pipelines will result in an additional 700-plus tankers traversing the waters off the Pacific coast.

“From pipelines to tankers to crude by rail, we’re facing an onslaught of new oil proposals, many of them toxic oil-sands oil, that would turn the Pacific Northwest into a giant shipping lane for oil, gas and for coal,” spokesman Matt Krogh said at a news conference Tuesday in Seattle.

“This is a cross-border question. It has cross-border impacts.”

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/us-oil-opponents-turn-attention-to-bc-pipelines/article14650942/?cmpid=rss1


Even moderate oil spill would 'overwhelm' B.C. resources, say officials

Documents reveal Coast Guard lack needed 'environmental expertise'

BY STANLEY TROMP AND GORDON HOEKSTRA, THE CANADIAN PRESS, VANCOUVER SUN AUGUST 26, 2013
Even moderate oil spill would 'overwhelm' B.C. resources, say officials

A worker uses a small boat to move logs on the Douglas Channel at dusk in Kitimat, B.C., in this Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012 photo. Officials in British Columbia privately warned the province lacks the ability to manage oil spills from existing and future oil traffic, and even a moderate spill would overwhelm their ability to respond, documents show.

Photograph by: Canadian Press , The Canadian Press, Vancouver Sun

Officials in British Columbia have privately warned the province lacks the ability to manage oil spills from existing and expanded oil traffic, and even a moderate spill would overwhelm their ability to respond, documents show.

Ottawa's decision to deal with coastal oil spills from a base in Quebec would make it much harder to contain spills here, and Transport Canada and the Coast Guard lack the needed "environmental expertise" to manage them, officials said in the documents obtained by The Canadian Press under freedom of information laws.

The notes were written by B.C. Environment Ministry officials for the incoming minister's briefing book in June, and other concerns were detailed by emergency response officials in memos from last year.

Environment Ministry bureaucrats voiced a range of misgivings for minister Mary Polak. "The Ministry of Environment, as the ministry responsible for preparedness, prevention, response and recovery for spills, is not adequately staffed and resourced to meet the existing and emerging expectations to address spills," they wrote in the briefing book.

"Even a moderately-sized spill would overwhelm the province's ability to respond and could result in a significant liability for government. ... The industry requirements, established by Transport Canada, are perceived as being insufficient in both scope and scale. For example, in both Washington state and Alaska industry requirements are far in excess of what is required in B.C."

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/Even+moderate+spill+would+overwhelm+resources+officials/8832241/story.html